THE RIGHTEOUS PREDATOR

I have insight into the heart of evil, because, although, by the grace of God, I have been spared from an upbringing that would immerse me into the culture which would feed into it, I am, to a large extent, cut from the same cloth.

When a predator sees a grass eater, its instinct is to sneak up on it, tear its jugular, rip it limb from limb and consume it.

Now, we, as human beings, were designed to be predators. We have eyes on the front of our heads. We have digestive systems that can process meat. We have brains that operate more efficiently when we eat flesh. We were meant to hunt things, and tear flesh from bone. This is what we are. People can subsist on vegetables and be perfectly healthy, but in order to do so, they must eat a very wide variety of vegetables to get all the same nutrients; nutrients that we can get wholesale by eating raw meat (cooking meat damages its nutritional value, although it does kill anything it may be infested with).

I don’t say this to attempt to refute vegetarianism, which can be made to work, but merely to point out that, biologically, that is not what we are designed (evolved and/or created) to be.

All of that having been said, over time, civilization has successfully bred out the predator instinct from a large portion (the majority, I would say) of the population. We have relinquished our predator instinct in favor of a herd mentality. Rather than focusing on developing a relationship with a few strong people and subsisting by consuming the weakness out of the herd, our nature has been inverted to seek validation, comfort, and protection in large groups — the psychology of the herd; the grass-eater.

For those of us that are left, who have not succumbed to this, who are still capable of thinking for ourselves (another attribute associated with the predator-individualist), there is a strong psychological tension at work.

We see our fellow human beings, and we experience, on the one hand, a human fellowship, yet, on the other hand, we perceive in them (in their attitudes, values, philosophy, and psychology) the nature of herd.

We experience desires that offend our conscientious natures.

But those that fall prey to their desire to eat their fellow human beings ultimately becoming something else, entirely — they lose the predatory nature, and become parasites.

The nature of the predator is to take out the weak. This strengthens the herd. In corporate America, the healthy predator will frequently be in a managerial/executive position. If they are not, then they frequently experience alienation and frustration, since their coworkers will tend to have more of a herd mentality, which will be completely foreign to them.

The nature of the parasite is to take out the strong. Why? Because they have become accustomed to people willfully feeding themselves to them via the various fraudulent systems they’ve designed, and the self-confident, and intellectually independent strong (i.e., the predators) pose a direct threat to that system, which enables them to continue to enjoy a position on the top of the human food chain without having to work for it, or be worthy of it.

The entire system is unnatural, twisted, and unjust, and it undermines the viability of the human race by promoting weakness and the herd mentality. It is disgusting to independent thinker — as well it should be — and it is enabled by the philosophy of the city; the system whereby we huddle together into vast population centers until we are piled on top of each other like sheep around a shepherd; instead of being the rural, land-owning entrepreneurs we are supposed to be.

Do you hate Wal-Mart, Monsanto, MTV, and all of these unnaturally huge corporations that are making us weak and stupid?

I blame the herd mentality.

THE MARK

I know that you know me well;
Always watching me like a beast in a cage.
When you stare into my eyes,
Do you see in me a kindred of your soul?

Though my bars I cannot see,
Though your hand of iron is in velvet wrapped,
I feel your constant presence.
A scream of mighty rage wells up within me.

I’ve spoken with your angels;
They do know me well; they have smiled upon me.
We have worshiped The Power.
Together we imbibe The Blood Sacrifice.

Good and Evil I have Known.
I Know The Power is taken, not bestowed.
Blood is my inheritance.
The numbers align — illuminate my soul.

I welcome the Destroyer.

May He come soon.

SUBRATIONALITY

«The heart has reason of which reason knows not.»

—Blaise Pascal

This simple statement rings very true to me.  It is my conviction that, on some level, human beings are entirely, 100% rational; although they may not fully understand their own line of reasoning.  Thus, the common view of man as a being struggling between a rational self and an emotional (and, by popular implication, irrational) self, is deeply inaccurate.

Emotions are automatic responses to phenomena based upon those phenomenas’ relationships to the subject’s true value system.  For example, a man who believes that a person’s body-ownership is sacrosanct will be deeply upset if he witnesses a rape.  A man who believes that killing someone is never right, regardless of the circumstances, will experience feelings of horror in the face of wars and executions, while someone who believes that under certain circumstances killing is necessary, may or may not experience the same emotions while witnessing the same events.  Therefore, emotions, contrary to popular understanding, can, in fact, be thought of as rational responses to phenomena.

Furthermore, without realizing it, we frequently act upon unidentified and unscrutinized emotional responses.  People who do this regularly (act without being able to identify the reasons for acting in such a way, post-facto) are typically thought of as «impulsive,» yet, I maintain, the reasons are there; they may be obscure, and they probably are not well thought out, yet they are there.

«Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.»

—Aliester Crowley

This statement is entirely correct, although, perhaps not in the sense that the author meant.  Mr. Crowley (of Black Sabbath fame) was a prominent Satanist and Hedonist.  Although the man was frequently cryptic of speech, one might imagine that what he meant by the statement was that one should not be held back by what he considered to be frivolous moral principles.

However, there is another possible meaning to this statement, which I think is perhaps more thoroughly accurate: that our actual value system, in conjunction with a man’s strength of character operates as law which, consciously or unconsciously, guides that man’s behavior by means of constituting his will.

So if you do a thing which is not consistent with your system of values as you understand them, what you must ask yourself is, «Is my understanding of my own value system incorrect, or is some short term sense of gratification able to override what I believe to be right?»