CASTING THE NET

matthew.13.47Article by Richard Goode.

Syndicated from Eternal Vigilance.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Mr. Goode is a Transegoist sympathizer; not a Transegoist — our syndication of his article does not indicate that he endorses the Transegoist philosophy.

I find this passage curious:

«Again, the reign of the heavens is like to a net that was cast into the sea, and did gather together of every kind, which, when it was filled, having drawn up again upon the beach, and having sat down, they gathered the good into vessels, and the bad they did cast out, so shall it be in the full end of the age, the messengers shall come forth and separate the evil out of the midst of the righteous, and shall cast them to the furnace of the fire, there shall be the weeping and the gnashing of the teeth.»
—The Gospel of Matthew 13:47-50 (Young’s Literal Translation)

This passage describes a process of selection. It is about a net. A net selects fish on the basis of size. Fish smaller in size than the apertures in the net pass through it. Fish larger in size than the apertures in the net do not.  This is selection

The fishermen collect the good fish in baskets, but throw the bad away.  This is selection.

The angels separate the wicked from the righteous and destroy the wicked by throwing them into the blazing furnace.  This is selection.

I can’t help but think that Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by natural selection has precedents in Scripture.

«Jesus saith to them, `Did ye understand all these?’ They say to him, `Yes, sir.'»
—The Gospel of Matthew 13:51 (Young’s Literal Translation)

EDITORS NOTE: I am the Editor in Chief of the Transegoist Daily Journal, and I approve this message.

THE HARVEST — A WORK OF THEOLOGICAL REALISM

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Article by PJ Cornell.

Overall assessment: 9 out of 10.

John Krygelski has given us something special with this book.

On the surface, the book seems to be a work of science fiction with gods and space aliens; and it could be described as science fiction — however, upon closer inspection, it becomes clear that this book is much more than that.  This book is what some, including (with some reservations) this reviewer, would consider to be a plausible realist’s explanation for God and the Bible.

This book is of interest on a number of levels.  In addition to having created a fascinating read, Mr. Krygelski has also created a philosophical treatise.  Think Jesus Christ meets Ayn Rand.  If you read the Gospel of Thomas and thought to yourself «Well, this makes more sense than what I was taught growing up,» then this book will resonate with you.  What is expressed here is not egoism, but neither is it altruism.  It rises above that obsolete distinction.

This book could be described as a work of Transegoist literature.

In this book, God is nothing if not a realist; and He insists that going to heaven requires that people achieve a certain strength of character, and he points out ways in which human morality, properly understood, is necessary for human survival as well as individual spiritual, psychological, and physical well-being.  I find the ethical ideas described in the book to be incisive, interesting and plausible.

Furthermore, Mr. Krygelski has developed his story (and the ideology expressed by it) within a scientific context, that seems to be mostly consistent with what I know about physics and objective existence.

My two reservations about the book are that, firstly, this book supports the idea of objective free will (as opposed to subjective free will), and does not make a strong enough case for it to my mind, and the antagonist, who we don’t really meet until the end, is far less complex than he should be, to my mind.

I must say that the Elohim character in the book is one of the most interesting characters I have ever encountered in fiction (and is, in many ways, a very plausible God archetype — which is a great accomplishment in and of itself), and, overall, the story was very engaging and difficult to put down.   I can’t help but think that if God exists and He’s coming back for us, that that event will bear striking resemblance to what this book describes.

I recommend this book to everyone.  It’s great work of fiction, it’s a compelling work of philosophy, and it’s a plausible explanation for existence and God.

THE MARK

I know that you know me well;
Always watching me like a beast in a cage.
When you stare into my eyes,
Do you see in me a kindred of your soul?

Though my bars I cannot see,
Though your hand of iron is in velvet wrapped,
I feel your constant presence.
A scream of mighty rage wells up within me.

I’ve spoken with your angels;
They do know me well; they have smiled upon me.
We have worshiped The Power.
Together we imbibe The Blood Sacrifice.

Good and Evil I have Known.
I Know The Power is taken, not bestowed.
Blood is my inheritance.
The numbers align — illuminate my soul.

I welcome the Destroyer.

May He come soon.