THE HARVEST — A WORK OF THEOLOGICAL REALISM

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Article by PJ Cornell.

Overall assessment: 9 out of 10.

John Krygelski has given us something special with this book.

On the surface, the book seems to be a work of science fiction with gods and space aliens; and it could be described as science fiction — however, upon closer inspection, it becomes clear that this book is much more than that.  This book is what some, including (with some reservations) this reviewer, would consider to be a plausible realist’s explanation for God and the Bible.

This book is of interest on a number of levels.  In addition to having created a fascinating read, Mr. Krygelski has also created a philosophical treatise.  Think Jesus Christ meets Ayn Rand.  If you read the Gospel of Thomas and thought to yourself «Well, this makes more sense than what I was taught growing up,» then this book will resonate with you.  What is expressed here is not egoism, but neither is it altruism.  It rises above that obsolete distinction.

This book could be described as a work of Transegoist literature.

In this book, God is nothing if not a realist; and He insists that going to heaven requires that people achieve a certain strength of character, and he points out ways in which human morality, properly understood, is necessary for human survival as well as individual spiritual, psychological, and physical well-being.  I find the ethical ideas described in the book to be incisive, interesting and plausible.

Furthermore, Mr. Krygelski has developed his story (and the ideology expressed by it) within a scientific context, that seems to be mostly consistent with what I know about physics and objective existence.

My two reservations about the book are that, firstly, this book supports the idea of objective free will (as opposed to subjective free will), and does not make a strong enough case for it to my mind, and the antagonist, who we don’t really meet until the end, is far less complex than he should be, to my mind.

I must say that the Elohim character in the book is one of the most interesting characters I have ever encountered in fiction (and is, in many ways, a very plausible God archetype — which is a great accomplishment in and of itself), and, overall, the story was very engaging and difficult to put down.   I can’t help but think that if God exists and He’s coming back for us, that that event will bear striking resemblance to what this book describes.

I recommend this book to everyone.  It’s great work of fiction, it’s a compelling work of philosophy, and it’s a plausible explanation for existence and God.