TAKING EVERY THOUGHT CAPTIVE

beautiful-sunriseArticle by Barbara Cornell.

Syndicated from Barbara Cornell’s personal blog.

I’ve often thought that intelligence is a double-edged sword. Being smart probably gives a person greater opportunity for success (defined in this instance as «happiness»), but at the same time it raises the threshold for happiness. The smarter you are, the more chances you have to attain the things that will make you happy, but you have to attain more of them in order to be happy.

One of the reasons this is true is becoming more apparent to me the older I get, because unlimited mental capacity seems to be one of the first things to suffer. When I was 23, there was literally nothing anyone could say to me that I couldn’t grasp immediately (faster than they could say it) and there was no line of reasoning that I couldn’t leap-frog to the end of faster than the intermediary steps could be specified.

These things are no longer true.

For example, just today I encountered the concept of «prions.»

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prion)

I never heard of these dudes before today, but they are basically proteins responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (like mad-cow disease). Somehow these things aren’t … alive … exactly … (which is why they cannot be killed via normal sterilization procedures such as heat or radiation) but neither are they strictly chemical … exactly … (which is why they can be affected by vaccines similar to those which prevent viral infections, even if none has to date been developed that is completely effective.)

Now there was a time when I would have chased that rabbit down its hole until I cornered it and claimed that sucker as mine. But now, I know that such might be possible but it probably isn’t worth the effort. Now I’m content to say, «It’s something that isn’t exactly alive but isn’t exactly not alive either.»

With age comes wisdom that it’s better not to concern myself with it. Maybe I could «claim» those things, but I have other issues that are better uses of my resources.

It seems that wisdom dictates this is true of a lot of things.

You know these things. They are «the things I cannot change» for which I strive to have «the serenity to accept.»

«Accepting» things doesn’t necessarily mean finding in yourself the ability to say they are right. It’s directing your thoughts to things that are better uses of your energy.

Take every thought captive, allow only those which are good for you to roam your mind.

«I trusted him, and he wronged me, and it makes me so mad.» But you’ve decided he is still your friend, and he’s asked forgiveness (or he never admitted he was wrong). Let it go. Stop it in its tracks before it gets started.

«But if that happens, then this will happen and then … I dunno what then, but it will be bad.» You’ve done everything you can to prevent it, and now it’s just wait and see. Take it captive. Give it no quarter in your heart or your mind.

Whatsoever things are true, honest, lovely, excellent. Think on these things.

SHAWN MULLINS: THE GUY WITH THE VOICE

SM3Music review by PJ Cornell.

Syndicated from the Asterisked Music Journal.

Assessment: 9 out of 10

Bottom line up front: This guy just needs to put out more songs.  But what he lacks in quantity, he makes up for in quality.  When he sings, it feels like he’s talking to you.  When he talks, it feels like he’s singing.  An incredible voice.

Highlights: Lullaby.  I think this is a cover; I’m certain I’ve heard this song before — but not performed this well.  Again, the best feature of this song is this guy’s incredible baritone.  What he has achieved with this recording is what meditation tapes try and fail to achieve — total relaxation in the deepest recesses of the soul.  Simply excellent.

Criticisms: More songs, please.

Conclusion: This guy’s manager should hook him up with a song writer and start putting out more recordings immediately.