DARPA’S TERN PROGRAM AIMS TO USE SHIPS FOR DRONE/UAV BASES

predator_drone_shipArticle by Turner Cox.

Syndicated from Thin Red-Line News.

According to DARPA, (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), they have started a new project called, TERN, or, Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node Program, which will allow drone bases to be aboard ships. The 40 month, 3-stage program will research and develop systems to allow small ships to serve as mobile bases for endurance drones and/or UAVs.

This program has a number of challenges to overcome, such as: allowing larger aircraft operations to operate on smaller vessels, minimize maintenance requirements for the floating bases, minimize the crew required to keep the bases afloat, and produce endurance UAVs that meet maritime conditional requirements.

This programs aims to implement faster response times to reconnaissance mission and drone strikes with low costs while minimizing the energy requirements. DARPA reports that Daniel Patt, DARPA’s program manager, said, “About 98 percent of the world’s land area lies within 900 nautical miles of ocean coastlines. Enabling small ships to launch and retrieve long-endurance UAVs on demand would greatly expand our situational awareness and our ability to quickly and flexibly engage in hotspots over land or water.” In other words, if this program is successful, it will allow drone bases to be deployed all over the world without ever having to touch land.

The TERN Program researchers and managers plan to cover the entire planet with attack and surveillance drones (also known as «unarmed aerial vehicles,» or «UAVs»). The US government says that drone strikes will not be used in the United States. However, former the Obama Press Secretary, Robert Gibbs, openly admits he lied to the American people about the drone programs (“When I went through the process of becoming press secretary, one of the first things they told me was, you’re not even to acknowledge the drone program”). What makes us think they don’t plan to us drone strikes in the United States?

EXPANSIONS (KRIS BECKER): THE KIND OF ART MUSIC THE MARKET MIGHT ACCEPT

photoArticle by PJ Cornell.

Syndicated from the Asterisked Music Journal.

Assessment: 9.7 out of 10.

Bottom line up front: For several decades now, the culture of the so called “art music” genre, which, in most cases might more aptly be called “academic music;” the institutional heir of what is known as “classical” music, has been to shun anything which might be construed as being accessible enough to be sold to the general public. This condescending attitude toward the listener has, predictably, led to the decline of art music consumption to an amount approaching zero. Kris Becker (composer and piano virtuoso) is a refreshing exception to this trend. This release abounds with clever quartal harmonies set to jazzy rhythms, and an upbeat attitude that, while sophisticated, does not take itself so seriously as to be a burden to listen to.

Highlights: This album, while being largely consistent in style (as opposed to some of his earlier releases, which were eclectic, to say the least), expresses a very wide range of emotional content, from the pensive Elegy, to the blindingly bright and upbeat Piano Sonata #1. One thing this release is not is boring — at any point in time. The harmonic center tends to shift suddenly, with little warning, and by the time we’ve processed the occurrence, we’re on to something else. The harmonic content, in general, is stable enough to not lose the audience, yet varied, dissonant, and progressive enough to hold the attention of the listener throughout each track.

Criticisms: This album does not break new ground in any revolutionary way; it sounds a lot like some of Barber’s better works — but it certainly displays mastery of the art. Think Hindemith spruced up for the market place. This isn’t even really a criticism; you could say that creating market-acceptable art music is a massive innovation in and of itself.

Conclusion: This is a highly sophisticated and listen-able release that displays a lot of theoretical, compositional, and performance mastery, while avoiding the common pitfall of being out of touch with what people want to hear.

NO WAY IN NO WAY OUT (SILLS AND SMITH): ALTERNATIVE TO THE ALTERNATIVE

51omOu6uGcL._SL500_AA280_Article by PJ Cornell.

Syndicated from the Asterisked Music Journal.

Assessment: 9.0 out of 10.

Bottom line up front: Imagine yourself somewhere in Canada. There’s snow on the ground. It’s dark. It’s cold. As you walk down the ice-laden road, you see a bar nestled amidst the pines. The lights inside flicker a warm glow out onto the frozen ground below. As you approach, you hear a band playing. The music is as warm and inviting as the weather outside is cold and harsh. You step into the bar. The band’s drummer gives you a smile and a nod as you approach the bar. You order a whiskey on the rocks. The drink is cold, but sweet, and warms you as it goes down. You let the fire on the hearth, your stiff drink, and the full sound of the band wash over you until you’re relaxed from head to toe.

Highlights: The best part of this album is that it is so stylistically expansive. There’s something for everybody: metal, post-hippie jams, country, adult alternative, and good old alternative rock. This band’s sound is very thick, and the songs have good trajectory. Would it be Different is a Pink Floydesque favorite of mine. Lot’s of complex harmonies, good use of vocal technique, and amazing guitar solos. Melancholy World is another really good one; it’s a very upbeat, yet emotionally complex song with a beat that anyone can get behind, and guitar solos that make your soul ache. I Can’t Reach You is a good bluesy jam. In Pain, they demonstrate their artistic versatility by busting out a straight-up numetal anthem which is strangely consistent with the feel of the rest of the album. These Ghosts is a dreamlike song with a country feel.

Criticisms: My only real criticism is that, in some of their songs, they would do well to space out the lyrics a little more. It occasionally seems that they try to compress too many words into a short space. They would do well to use shorter poems, or else give their song a little more space to breathe. They’re choruses are usually the highlights of their songs; for example, in I’m Right Here, their verses are little too wordy, but the chorus: “I’m right heeeeeeeere, I’m right heeeeeeeere….” gives me chills every time.

Conclusion: This is an excellent album, overall. The more you listen to it, the more you like it. This album is better than their first one, a worthy effort in its own right (review pending) and I think the next one will be even better. I look forward to hearing it.

WITH THESE WORDS: BEAUTY DISMAYED (SINGLE)

th_guitarArticle by PJ Cornell.

Syndicated from The Asterisked Music Journal.

Assessment: 8 out of 10.

Bottom line up front: This is the only song this band has published so far (as of 18 February 2013).  However, this little gem of a song shows great promise for the band, and I look forward to hearing more.

Highlights: This song has two things going for it.  Firstly, the rhythms, in conjunction with diatonic quartal harmonic accents are very ear-catching.  Secondly, the singer’s thin, pretty voice is perfectly complemented by the sparse, acoustic instrumental ensemble (piano and violin).  The piano riff (which is really a full fledged tune which is repeated over and over) is just complex enough to stay interesting throughout the entire song.  The countermelody in the violin is expertly done.  I particularly enjoyed the double stop sections.

Criticisms: The song is a tad repetitive, although not so much that it is actually unpleasant.  Also, I’d like to hear a little more range out of the singer.

Conclusion: Well done, guys!  This is a solid piece, overall.  It sounds like a cross between a Motet, an Art Song, and Acoustic Pop.  It’s a very pleasant brew of sonic textures, with engaging polyphonic trajectory and rhythmic language.  I look forward to hearing more from you in the future.